Review – The Warped Web

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I am proud to announce that The Warped Web has achieved a five-star review by Readers’ Favorite. A huge congrats to the amazing Vivian Head.

Reviewed by Jack Magnus for Readers’ Favorite.

“The Warped Web is a private investigator murder mystery written by Vivian Head. Rex Salomon had been a natural at crime solving, and he easily progressed up the ranks of the Metropolitan Police. He was following in his father’s own footsteps and was successfully commanding a murder squad when his growing struggles with necrophobia made it impossible for him to function on the job. While he had long been successful in suppressing his reaction to death and the dead bodies that were an inevitable part of his day-to-day work, a last particularly gruesome cadaver proved to be his breaking point. Were it not for the lucky chance that his partner had found him poised on the roof of the headquarters and ready to jump, Rex would have ended it all, there and then. Working with the police psychiatrist gave him some tools to combat the worst attacks, but they were insufficient to address the underlying phobia. 

After several months, Rex left his job and family and went to Malta, hoping the change of venue, relaxation and warmth would help him heal. His return, some months later, was met with his wife’s refusal to let him in the door of his former home and a rueful realization of his dwindling personal resources. Then he overheard a conversation between two women, one of whom was crying, and the other, on impulse, reached out to him for a referral to a private investigator. Rex had a momentary flash of brilliance as he realized that this was what he could do with his life — he’d set up an office and become a private eye.

Vivian Head’s private investigator murder mystery, The Warped Web, is a well-written and thought-provoking story about a strange cult-like society that seemed to have the power to render its victims passive and unable to resist the commands of the ominous-looking Babatune, who presided over the mysterious affairs at 52c Quarry Lane. I enjoyed seeing how Rex uses his innate abilities to grab the opportunity offered him and loved watching as he first finds himself an office and lodgings, and then proceeds to assemble a team to help him solve the case. The Warped Web is filled with intriguing twists, turns and inexplicable shadowy apparitions which serve quite well in heightening the suspense, tension and urgency of the tale, and I found this book quite difficult to put down until I had finished the last page. The Warped Web is most highly recommended.”

The Warped Web – An Excerpt

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He turned, and was about to walk towards the door, when he noticed a drop of blood about the size of an old sixpence on the corner of the sink. He was certain it wasn’t there when he first came in. He studied himself carefully to see if his body had left this unsavoury mark on the white porcelain. “No, not me!” he said, positive that it was not his own body fluid. He glanced at the floor and noticed several other red spots which were leading towards the door. He followed the trail but stopped dead when he saw a dark shadow through the frosted glass. As far as he knew, the other offices, of which there were two, had all closed at five which meant he should be the only person left in the building. He wasn’t sure whether it was the remains of the alcohol playing tricks on him but he felt the hairs stand up on the back of his neck and he froze . . .

*The Warped Web is out now on paperback and ebook.

https://www.puiyinwlpublishing.com/thewarpedweb

The Warped Web – Counting down the days

Just less than 3 weeks to go until the release of ‘The Warped Web’ – 22nd August. You can pre-order online or visit the nearest selected bookshops. For UK-based readers/fans, you can pop into any Waterstones, Foyles and Blackwells. https://www.puiyinwlpublishing.com/thewarpedweb

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The Warped Web

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© Vivian Head 2017

https://www.puiyinwlpublishing.com/novels

PUIYIN W.L. PUBLISHING® is very proud and honoured to present ‘The Warped Web’, a thriller by Vivian Head, due out in mid-August. Vivian is no stranger to the publishing industry, and after commissioning so many books for others, it was about time she sat down and wrote one for herself. The thriller is just one of the many books Vivian will be writing, and PUIYIN W.L. PUBLISHING® is so blessed to have her join the ‘family’.

18. THE POSITIVITY PROJECT – ONE EMAIL TO READ BEFORE WORK (DAY 10)

Get your AM brain into gear by signing up to gohighbrow.com’s fun email-learning platform. It sends a five-minute lesson (on a huge range of subjects – money, art, tech, health) straight to your inbox each morning for ten days.

Day 10 – Wrapping It Up

From Highbrow:

Congrats, you made it till the end of this 10-day course. Now it’s time to wrap things up.

You have now made the first steps to apply the science of happiness to your life. You have not only read but also experienced the lessons and activities in this email course first-hand. But it takes time and effort to master a new skill as well as it takes time and effort to develop self-confidence.

This ten-day framework provided an intro to the topic but it needs more continuous effort to really make a lasting difference. Besides, there are a huge variety of more topics that positive psychologists and neuroscientists are researching at the moment.

Among others, there’s how to discover and use your strengths to become happier and more effective at work. There’s also a lot of research on what makes happy relationships stand out from others, how to find happiness in the moment and much more.

To end this course, you can try this a method called sentence stem completion. This exercise can be used to facilitate your personal growth. You can use this exercise to consolidate the insights you had throughout the course. Find at least 10 endings to this sentence stem:

Living happily to me means…

For example, one of my sentence stem exercises looked like this:

Living happily to me means …

… having dinner with my family.

… working on a project that makes the world a better place.

… having good food in my home.

… making a positive difference in the world.

… enjoying the company of others.

… spending some time alone.

… having someone to talk to.

17. THE POSITIVITY PROJECT – ONE EMAIL TO READ BEFORE WORK (DAY 9)

Get your AM brain into gear by signing up to gohighbrow.com’s fun email-learning platform. It sends a five-minute lesson (on a huge range of subjects – money, art, tech, health) straight to your inbox each morning for ten days.

Day 9 – Understanding self-compassion

From Highbrow:

Do you treat yourself as well as you treat your close friends and your family? People who find it easy to be supportive and understanding to others are often surprisingly self-deprecating. They beat themselves up for small failures like being overweight or not exercising.

One way to deal with this overly harsh self-treatment is to be more forgiving with ourselves. And that’s where we enter the realm of self-compassion.

It’s often easier to understand self-compassion when we first understand what it means to have compassion for others. Compassion basically involves three components: When we are compassionate, we first notice another person’s suffering. Then we respond kindly and caringly. And last, we remind them that they are not alone and every human being shares these experiences.

Let’s say you have a close friend who tells you about something that’s wrong in her life. If you have compassion you sense her suffering. You respond kindly and wholeheartedly to this suffering, give support, maybe even a hug. And then, you might tell your friend that she is not alone, that it’s an experience that everyone shares once in a while.

Self-compassion works in pretty much the same way. Rather than beating ourselves up when we don’t stick to a diet or get a bad mark on an important exam, it’s much more beneficial to respond in a self-compassionate way:

First, we need to notice that we are suffering. That can often be harder than we initially think. Because in a difficult or stressful situation we hardly ever take time to step back and recognize how hard it is for us in the moment.

Second, stop judging ourselves and start bringing kindness to ourselves. Often the reason for our suffering is that we judge ourselves too harshly. When we’re self-compassionate we remember that it’s really hard to feel inadequate or ashamed.

And thirdly, remember that suffering and imperfection is part of the shared human experience. Not everything in life is perfect – everyone on earth makes mistakes and experiences negative emotions.

Tal Ben-Shahar, former Harvard professor, gives the example that there are only two kinds of people who do not experience negative emotions. The first group are psychopaths. By definition, they do not experience emotions like shame or embarrassment. And the second group of people who don’t experience negative emotions are dead. So if we look at it from this perspective, it’s good if we experience negative emotions. Because it means that we are still alive and not a psychopath.

Often the initial reaction of many people sounds something like this: ‘Hmm I am not sure about this self-compassion thing. I need to be harsh with myself, otherwise I’ll never make the change.’

But in reality, this deprecating self-criticism is not at all helpful. We are not making ourselves a better person by beating ourselves up all the time. We are just causing ourselves to feel inadequate and insecure while we should be kind and supportive to ourselves when we most need it. Practicing self-compassion has now been researched for over a decade and by now there is a lot of evidence showing it’s a powerful way to open the door to real and lasting happiness.

16. THE POSITIVITY PROJECT – ONE EMAIL TO READ BEFORE WORK (DAY 8)

Get your AM brain into gear by signing up to gohighbrow.com’s fun email-learning platform. It sends a five-minute lesson (on a huge range of subjects – money, art, tech, health) straight to your inbox each morning for ten days.

Day 8 – Understanding Savoring

From Highbrow:

Today’s about savoring: Fully enjoying an experience or a memory. It is, as its name suggests, a sort of running the positive experience around in one’s mouth, really tasting, valuing and enjoying it. Savoring only requires us to pay attention and enjoy our experience. That can be the food we’re eating, the music we’re listening to, the comfortable feeling of lying in our bed on a Sunday morning or anything else that gives you pleasure. While mindfulness is about experiencing the present moment as it is, savoring is about the focus on the positive.

Think of a wine expert tasting an expensive glass of wine. She starts by looking at the wine, holding it against the light. She tries to notice its color and viscosity. The next step is to smell the wine; breathing the aromas in deeply. Only now she takes a sip. She rolls the wine around in her mouth in order to take in all the aromas, all the nuances of flavor. It is an indulgence and all her attention is focused on how the wine feels. After she finally swallows, she has focused intensely on the whole experience and enjoyed it thoroughly. What this wine expert just did, is what psychologists call savoring.

The key lesson is to ‘enjoy now’. We often imagine a happier future and tell ourselves things like, ‘Once I finish this project, then I can finally relax’. This causes us to focus on something that is going to make us happy in the future rather than the joy we can find in our lives right now. If we can enjoy the present, we don’t need to count on and live for the happiness that is in our future.

A decent amount of research confirms the positive impact of savoring on our happiness and satisfaction with life. People who savor frequently are also less depressed and more optimistic.

Today, take an experience and savor it for at least a few minutes. There is an infinite number of things you can choose to savor: going for a walk, reading a book, eating dinner, listen to your favorite song, playing a game… It doesn’t need to be anything unusual. Just remember that savoring is a process, not an outcome. Pay full attention, indulge with your senses. And if you want, follow this process:

  1. Slow down
  2. Pay attention to what you are doing
  3. Use all your senses
  4. Stretch out the experience
  5. Reflect on your enjoyment.